Duet of Remembrance

We remember the Holocaust with two concerts that honor the 75th anniversary of the liberation of concentration camps.
           

Duet of Remembrance

We remember the Holocaust with two concerts that honor the 75th anniversary of the liberation of concentration camps.
   

Two-concert package

We remember the Holocaust with two concerts that honor the 75th anniversary of the liberation of concentration camps. These concerts are sold only as a pair or as part of a subscription. Duet tickets start at $60. Or receive a 15% discount by subscribing to the rest of our season.

Dreams
Saturday, February 29 | Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza
Sunday, March 1 | Rancho Campana Performing Arts Center

Violins of Hope
Saturday, April 18 | Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza
Sunday, April 19 | Rancho Campana Performing Arts Center

These concerts are sold only as a pair or as part of a subscription.

Thousand Oaks | Buy Tickets >>

February 29 , 2020 | 7:30 PM
April 18, 2020 | 7:30 PM


Camarillo
|
Buy Tickets >>

March 1, 2020 | 3:00 PM
April 19, 2020 | 3:00 PM

 

Dreams

Saturday, February 29 | 7:30 PM
Bank of America PAC, Thousand Oaks

Sunday, March 1 | 3:00 PM
Rancho Campana PAC, Camarillo

Uplifting music that acted as a beacon of hope, buoying people in the darkest of times. Brundibár was performed in the Thereseinstadt concentration camp and yet encourages faith in humankind.

Concert Highlights

  • Written for a children’s opera competition in 1938, Brundibár (Czech for “bumblebee”) was performed by kids at the Jewish Orphanage in Belgicka Street in Prague before Nazis began transporting Czech Jews to Terezin in 1942. A score of the opera was smuggled into the camp in 1943, where Hans Krása orchestrated it for the musicians in the camp. Seeing the propaganda potential, the Nazi regime sponsored a documentary featuring productions of the opera as they performed for the Red Cross International inspectors in September 1944. Two weeks later artists in the production were transported to Auschwitz, but the beautiful memory of the production lives on in performances today. With characters like “fearless sparrow,” “keen cat,” and “wise dog,” it is a sweet children’s tale of overcoming adversity.
  • An often-overlooked child prodigy, Felix Mendelssohn was 16 years old when he wrote the overture to A Midsummer Night’s Dream for piano, written to accompany a reading of the Shakespeare comedy in the Mendelssohn family home. He immediately scored it for orchestra and began a wildly successful musical career. Seventeen years later, the king of Prussia asked Felix to write music for a production of the entire play, and that music has echoed throughout history, including the ubiquitous “Wedding March.”

Saturday, February 29 | 7:30 PM
Fred Kavli Theater, Thousand Oaks

Sunday, March 1 | 3:00 PM
Rancho Campana PAC, Camarillo

Program

 

Michael Christie, conductor

The Glywn and Ruth Chase Music Director

California Lutheran University Choir, Women’s Chorale and Areté Vocal Ensemble

Dr. Wyant Morton, choir director

Los Robles Children’s Choir

Edward Rouse, artistic director

Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Krása Brundibár

ENTR’ACTE

Haas Study for Strings

Violins of Hope

Saturday, April 18 | 7:30 PM
Bank of America PAC, Thousand Oaks

Sunday, April 19 | 3:00 PM
Rancho Campana PAC, Camarillo

A collection of string instruments lovingly restored and with their own stories from the Holocaust.

Concert Highlights

  • Amnon Weinstein, a violin maker in Israel, was asked by a customer to restore a dilapidated old violin. He discovered the owner had survived Auschwitz. Inside the violin was black ash. Years later, several more violins like it emerged, and Weinstein lovingly and painstakingly restored them. Ornately adorned with decorations and stars of David, instruments like these were a beloved part of any Jewish home of the time, each carrying the touch of their previous owner. These instruments enjoy renewed life on the stage as part of Violins of Hope, in a piece written just for them: Jonathan Leshnoff’s Symphony No. 4 “Heichalos.”
  • Rachmaninoff, a tremendously skilled pianist, opened his Third Piano Concerto in an unusual way for him: with simplicity. However, the piano quickly establishes itself as the dominant voice with forceful and virtuosic complexity. While the melodies in the piano came almost effortlessly to him, the orchestra part gave Rachmaninoff considerable trouble. He decided the orchestra should so delicately accompany the piano as not to “muffle” its singing voice, but all the while the orchestra and piano enjoy a gentle and precise dialogue.

Saturday, April 18 | 7:30 PM
Fred Kavli Theater, Thousand Oaks

Sunday, April 19 | 3:00 PM
Rancho Campana PAC, Camarillo

Program

 

Michael Christie, conductor

The Glywn and Ruth Chase Music Director

Olga Kern, piano

Newman Diary of Anne Frank Suite
Leshnoff Symphony No. 4 “Heichalos”
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3

 

ENTR’ACTE

Bacewicz Concerto for String Orchestra (Allegro)