Press Release

New West Symphony

John Baldon FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
jbaldon@newwestsymphony.org September 16, 2016
 

 

 

 

New West Symphony to Open 2016/2017 Masterpiece Series Season with Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

 

The New West Symphony will open its 2016/2017 Masterpiece Series season with a celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. The program will include Danzón No. 2 by Arturo Márquez, Miguel del Aguila’s Concierto en Tango, the Suite from Appalachian Spring (1945) by Aaron Copland and Georges Bizet’s Carmen Suite. Mark Tanner, the New West Symphony’s principal cellist, will be the soloist for Concierto en Tango.

 

Tania Miller, the first of six music director candidates appearing this season, will lead the orchestra in two performances of the program. The first performance takes place on Friday, September 30, 2016 at 8:00 pm at the Oxnard Performing Arts Center located at 800 Hobson Way in Oxnard. The program will be repeated on Saturday, October 1, 2016 at 8:00 pm at the Bank of America Performing Arts Center, located at 2100 Thousand Oaks Boulevard in Thousand Oaks.

The celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month will include a pre-concert fiesta beginning at 6:30 pm prior to the Friday evening performance in Oxnard. Taco and tamale plates from Evita’s Mexican Café will be available for $15 per plate at the fiesta. Students from the New West Symphony Harmony Project of Ventura County will provide the fiesta entertainment.

 

Tickets:  Tickets priced from $34 to $124 are available by phone, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday at 1-866-776-8400.  Tickets are also available in person at the New West Symphony office, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday and through the Symphony web site 24/7 at newwestsymphony.org.  Tickets are also available at the respective concert hall box offices.

Hear & Now Live:  These lively and informative, 30-minute pre-concert discussions about the music on the program begin one hour prior to the performances.  The programs are free and open to ticket holders for the respective performances.

 

About the Conductor

In 2016-2017 Tania Miller will celebrate her fourteenth season as Music Director of the Victoria (BC) Symphony in a position that she has occupied with great distinction and growing acclaim. As the first Canadian woman to be Music Director of a major Canadian symphony orchestra, Tania Miller and the Victoria Symphony celebrated the orchestra's 75th anniversary in 15-16 by touring Canada with performances in Vancouver, Ottawa, Quebec City and Toronto.

Click Here for a complete biography.

 

About the Soloist

Cellist Mark Tanner began his cello studies at the age of eight with Joel Krosnick; a year later, he was accepted by Aldo Parisot, and remained with him for the next 15 years, receiving both Bachelor of Arts cum laude and Master of Music degrees from Yale University.

A regular soloist with orchestras from coast to coast, he also performs extensively as a chamber musician. He has performed in the prestigious Marlboro Festival, and also appeared as a guest artist with the Wall Street Chamber Players, the Coyote Consort, and the 20th Century Unlimited in Santa Fe. He presented the West Coast premiere of the Tan Dun "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" Concerto. More recently, he appeared with conductor Raymond Leppard and the Grand Rapids Symphony. Click Here for a complete biography.

 

About the Music

 

Arturo Márquez, born in Alamos Sonora, Mexico in 1950, is one of Mexico’s most respected musicians. He has received commissions from the Organization of American States, Universidad Metropolitana de México, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Festival del Caribe, Festival de la Ciudad de México, 1992 Seville World’s Fair and Rockefeller Foundation, and grants from the Institute of Fine Arts of Mexico, French Government, Fulbright Foundation and other prestigious organizations.

 

Márquez has composed four works for varied instrumentation titled Danzón. He noted, “I discovered that the apparent lightness of the danzón hides a music full of sensuality and rigor, music of nostalgia and joy that our old folks live with, a world that we can still grasp in the dance music of Veracruz and the dance halls of Mexico City. Danzón No. 2 is a tribute to the world that nurtured it. It tries to get as close as possible to the dance, to its nostalgic melodies and its monotonous rhythms, and although it desecrates its intimacy, form and harmonic vocabulary, it is a personal way of expressing my admiration and feelings towards real Mexican popular music.”

Miguel del Aguila, born in Montevideo, Uruguay on September 15, 1957, earned diplomas in theory and composition from the Escuela Municipal de Musica and the Conservatorio Audem in his native city before moving to the United States in 1978 to study at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where he received his degree in piano in 1982. Following his graduation, del Aguila lived for the next decade in Vienna, where he studied at the Hochschule für Musik, composed, taught, conducted, played piano and had several works performed at the city’s most prominent concert halls. Since settling permanently in Los Angeles in 1992, del Aguila has established himself among America’s leading composers. He has served as music director of the choral ensemble Ojai Camerata and  taught at Ventura College.

Miguel del Aguila wrote of his Concierto en Tango, commissioned in 2014 by the Buffalo Philharmonic for the ensemble’s Principal Cellist, Roman Mekinulov, “In 2012, Roman suggested to me the idea of writing a concerto in tango style that would explore the less classical sound and technique of the cello. I liked this idea, as the cello has the intensity and expressivity of a tango singer and is an excellent medium for such a work.”Aaron Copland composed the music for Appalachian Springfor Martha Graham on a commission from Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. The work was premiered in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 1944 with a chamber orchestra due to space limitations. In 1945, Copland revised the score as a suiteof eight continuous sections for full orchestra by eliminating about eight minutes of music.

 

Aaron Copland composed the music for Appalachian Springfor Martha Graham on a commission from Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. The work was premiered in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 1944 with a chamber orchestra due to space limitations. In 1945, Copland revised the score as a suiteof eight continuous sections for full orchestra by eliminating about eight minutes of music.

Georges Bizet’s Carmen is among the most popular operas ever written. Following Bizet’s death, his friend Ernest Guiraud assembled two suites drawing on music from the full score.

Click Here for complete program notes.

 

About the New West Symphony:  Founded in 1995, the New West Symphony is a professional orchestra that draws its players from the rich talent pool of professional Los Angeles-area musicians. The Symphony is the resident company of the Oxnard Performing Arts Center, the Bank of America Performing Arts Center and Barnum Hall in Santa Monica.  It presents six Masterpiece Series concerts annually, performing major works from the symphonic repertoire with internationally-acclaimed artists as guest soloists.  The Symphony also provides quality outreach and educational opportunities for the communities it serves through its annual Symphonic Adventures concert programs for youth, its traveling Music Van, and its New West Symphony Harmony Project of Ventura County, a year-round, tuition–free music and leadership program for underserved students.

 

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